Tag Archives: Conti

Monroe Bypass Legal Saga Approaching End of Road, Could Impact Bonner Bridge Litigation

Image from ncdot.gov

Oral arguments are set to take place before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia on March 20, 2012 in connection with an appeal asserted by several environmental groups seeking to stall construction of the Monroe Connector Bypass (commonly known as the “Monroe Bypass”) in Union County.  If the Fourth Circuit rejects the appeal and allows the project to move forward, a groundbreaking is expected in August of this year, as reported late last week by the Charlotte Observer.

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Monroe Bypass Project Allowed To Proceed; Approval of Bonner Bridge Replacement Project On-Tap?

November 1, 2011 Update:  Lawyers from the Southern Environmental Law Center have appealed Judge Dever’s decision to the 4th Cirtcuit Court of Appeals.  As the Charlotte Observer notes, the appeal is not expected to postpone construction of the bypass.  Also in today’s Charlotte Observer is this story regarding the potential far-reaching impact of the project, including for area construction crews.

Original October 25, 2011 Story:  Earlier today, summary judgment entered in favor of the N.C. Department of Transportation (“NCDOT”) in a lawsuit brought by lawyers from the Southern Environmental Law Center seeking to stop the Monroe Bypass project in Union County from moving forward.  As reported by News 14 Carolina (story and video here), work can now begin on the $824 million project.  The new toll road will run approximately 20 miles from Highway 74 at I-485 to Highway 74 between Wingate and Marshville.

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Based on my cursory review of the Monroe Bypass opinion, it appears the attorneys for the Southern Environmental Law Center advanced arguments that are substantially similar to those they are making in a separate litigation concerning the planned Bonner Bridge replacement project in Dare County, on which I commented back in September.   Specifically, counsel argued that NCDOT did not carefully analyze the potential environmental impacts of the project, thereby violating the National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”) of 1969.  Judge James C. Dever III disagreed in a 28-page Order reciting, in a fair amount of detail, the steps taken by NCDOT to analyze the environmental impacts of the project and comply with NEPA.

Since both the Monroe Bypass and Bonner Bridge matters are pending in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina, Judge Dever’s ruling is likely to cast a long shadow over the OBX litigation.   Indeed, unless NCDOT handled the environmental impact studies for the OBX project in a substantially less comprehensive manner than Judge Dever describes with respect to the Monroe Bypass project, it is difficult to envision a scenario where the Southern Environmental Law Center prevails in stopping the Bonner Bridge replacement project from moving forward.

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Charlotte Commuters Feeling HOT HOT HOT?

Creative carpool-lane scofflaws, like this artiste from New York, might soon be able to retire their mannequins, at least in the Charlotte area.  As reported in today’s Charlotte Observer, N.C. Department of Transportation Secretary Gene Conti informed the Charlotte City Council on Monday that a contractor could be selected to convert high-occupancy vehicle (“HOV”) lanes to high-occupancy toll (“HOT”) lanes on I-77 as soon as this time next year.   Once the conversion is complete, high-occupancy vehicles would be authorized to use the HOT lanes without charge, but solo motorists trying to shorten their morning and evening commutes would have to pay a toll via electronic transponder.

Image by CountyLemonade via Creative Commons license

The project could cost upwards of $200 million, but it wasn’t the price tag that caught my eye.  Rather, I’m interested in the possibility that the conversion could be financed through a public-private partnership.  A number of other states have either utilized or are considering utilizing “PPP’s” in developing HOT lanes.  In fact, Georgia appears primed to build new toll lanes alongside I-75 and I-575 in Cobb and Cherokee counties through a PPP, at a price tag over $1 billion.

Which got me to thinking:

  • What are the potential legal issues that must be considered before the NCDOT engages in a PPP for an HOT?
  • What are the public policy considerations?
  • Might the politics of developing so-called “Lexus Lanes” be too HOT to handle?

I hope to give these questions some additional thought in the days ahead and provide some additional insights in a subsequent blog post.

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More Support for Megaport?

Count the Brunswick County Commissioners among those in support of a feasibility study for the proposed N.C. International Terminal “megaport” in Southport; full story here.

Image courtesy happykanppy via FreeDigitalPhotos.net

While the N.C. Ports Authority shelved the project in July 2010, Department of Transportation Secretary Gene Conti recently said that a $1.7M review of the State’s ports strategy would consider the megaport anew. This new study has stoked the project’s opposition, as set forth in this story.

Stay tuned.

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